Anthony Neoh parts the waters in HK

When the person overseeing the police on behalf of the public says that a political solution is needed to the city’s unrest crisis, it’s best to take notice. Anthony Neoh, former head of the SFC and a widely respected barrister, is currently head of the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC). The IPCC has been given the unenviable task of looking into police conduct during the protests. Thankfully, it has someone like Neoh at the helm.

As Neoh told the SCMP over the weekend, the police cannot be expected to put this protest down. It is political in nature; it needs political solutions. Demanding that the protests end before discussions or reviews can begin is not pragmatic, he points out. As long as the violence subsides, and the trend toward calmer demonstrations is evident, the initiative needs to be seized. This should start with properly acknowledging the spark that set the prairie on fire, the extradition bill, and properly put it out by formally withdrawing it from the Legislative Council.

Read more of his level-headed, common-sensical advice on scmp.com.

It remains to be seen, however, whether Chief Executive Carrie Lam is up to the task at hand. She does appear to have better support now, as the pro-establishment camp has been whipped into line by the HKMAO. But there is still a lot of hard work ahead. Neoh has parted the waters; but will she lead her people to the promised land?

Pardon the exaggerated metaphor, dear readers. But to continue it, to get through the turbulent waters in which Hong Kong finds itself will require more than the right direction. Lam is going to have to come up with some bold initiatives if she wants to show that she really is sincere in addressing the protesters’ grievances.

Here, too, she has had some good guidance from commentators recently. One is by the SCMP’s former editor, Wang Xiangwei. Wang argues that any attempt to address the underlying causes of the protests is going to have to result in taking action against the property barons and other vested-interest groups.

As he says, Lam needs to unveil a bold vision to tackle the “grey rhino” risks long associated with Hong Kong – sky-high property prices, worsening inequality, lack of social mobility for youth, and woefully underfunded social security. Previous chief executives have all talked about it. None has acted.

To do this, Lam must “bite the bullet”, says Wang, and seek the full support of the central government to take on vested interest groups, including property tycoons, the Heung Yee Kuk, and even environmental groups.

If Wang is writing this, it is highly likely that this is, in fact, what Beijing is already thinking. All she has to do is ask.

Read more on scmp.com

Tell us what you think